PD INDEX TOP

    PD INDEX: A Directory of Parkinson’s Disease Information on the Internet

PD Index provides a directory of information about Parkinson’s disease (PD) that is available on the internet.  The directory also includes references to information that is not specific to PD but is still likely to be useful to persons for whom PD is a concern.

Information sources are indexed in the directory according to the specific topics that they cover.  Topics are listed alphabetically under broad categories called “areas of interest”.  You may view topics and access information by first selecting the appropriate area:

GENERAL AND OVERVIEW INFORMATION
SYMPTOMS, DIAGNOSIS, CLINICAL FEATURES
CAUSES; NEUROANATOMY; DISEASE PATHOLOGY
MEDICAL AND FAMILY CARE
DRUG THERAPY
SPECIFIC DRUGS
SURGERY
DIET; NUTRITIONAL SUPPLEMENTS
EMOTIONAL AND SOCIAL ASPECTS; SUPPORT
EXERCISE; PHYSICAL AND OTHER THERAPIES
HINTS AND ASSISTIVE DEVICES FOR EVERYDAY LIVING
EMPLOYMENT; DISABILITY; INSURANCE; LEGAL
ORGANIZATIONS; FUND RAISING; ADVOCACY; VOLUNTEERING
RELATED DISEASES
ADDITIONAL SOURCES AND FACILITIES
To browse a list of all the PD Index topics without regard to area of interest, select a letter of the alphabet at which to begin:

A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  7
To read more about PD Index, click here.


IMPORTANT NOTICE
With this web site I have tried to provide an index to useful and accurate information on the Internet related to living with and treating Parkinson’s disease.  Currently, health problems and other commitments are making it difficult for me to keep the index up to date.  It may be increasingly necessary to perform supplemental searches on your own in order to obtain information that I have not been able to index.  Here are some suggestions for doing this.

1.  Become familiar with the use of  search engines if you aren’t already.  I recommend Google.   Unfortunately, the search engines only look up web pages containing the words you give them.  They don’t understanding the material or what it is you are looking for.

2.  The number of web pages that Google returns containing the phrase “Parkinson’s disease” exceeds 200,000.  Much of the information is of a general nature and tends to be based on or even copied from other sources.

3.  Use additional search terms to do a more focused search.  Become familiar with and use the medical terminology of PD as represented by the topics in PD Index.  For example, the medical term for “shaking” is “tremor.”

4.  Google allows you to limit a search to just one web site by including site:xxxxxx.yyy, where xxxxxx.yyy are the rightmost parts of the Internet address (URL), in the search box.  Example:  site:ninds.nih.gov.  Search the web sites that specialize in PD.  These in general belong to some of the organizations that I have indexed. The National Parkinson Foundation has the most extensive web site (http://www.parkinson.org).   Some of these sites have their own search functions.

5.  Become familiar with the names of the experts on PD. These tend to be associated with the leading organizations or academic medical centers.  Some of the PD web sites have a facility to “ask the doctor.”

6.  Important subjects that require special care in selection of information include coexistence of PD with another condition, advanced PD, and PD in the elderly.

7.  A few web pages were created when the World Wide Web began and have not been updated since then.   Look for a date of any infomation you find.

It may be useful to get a good book or two on PD.  I am familiar with the following:
Parkinson’s Disease: The Complete Guide for Patients and Caregivers by A. N. Lieberman, Frank L. Williams.  This is an older book, out of date on drugs and surgery, and possibly replaced by other books by Dr. Lieberman listed below, but it contains the best descriptions I’ve seen of PD symptoms.

Parkinson’s Disease: A Guide for Patient and Family by Roger C.Duvoisin and Jacob Sage, now in its 5th edition.

Parkinson’s Disease – Questions and Answers, Third Edition, by Robert A. Hauser, Theresa A. Zesiewicz and Abraham Lieberman. Rather technical, written for medical professionals, but accessible by knowledgable patients.

Eat Well, Stay Well With Parkinson’s disease by Kathrynne Holden.  The classic on dietary information.

For patients’ experience and perspectives, see When Parkinson’s Strikes Early: Voices, Choices, Resources, and Treatment by Barbara Blake-Krebs, Linda Herman and Susan Reese (Foreword).

I have not read the following, but their authors include experts on PD:

Parkinson’s Disease: A Complete Guide for Patients and Families (Johns Hopkins Press Health Book) by William J.Weiner, Lisa M. Shulman and Anthony E.Lang.

Shaking Up Parkinson by Abraham Lieberman.

100 Questions & Answers about Parkinson Disease by Abraham Lieberman, due in print in September 2002.

Parkinson’s Disease : The Way Forward! An Integrated Approach including Drugs, Surgery, Nutrition, Bowel and Muscle Function, Self- Esteem, Sexuality, Stress Control and Carers by Geoffrey Leader, Aroldo Rossi and Lia Rossi Prosperi.

Diagnosis and Management of Parkinson’s Disease, 3rd Edition by Cheryl H. Waters.

Parkinson’s Disease and Parkinsonism in the Elderly by Jolyon Meara (Editor) and William C. Koller (Editor).


PD Index also has a page for an article containing Advice to the Newly Diagnosed. This will later become part of a planned opinion and editorial section.

There is as yet no cure for Parkinson’s disease, and the specific causes are unknown.  Continued research is therefore necessary. Government and foundation grants are not sufficient to fund all the research that is need.  For information on donating to support Parkinson’s disease research, please click here for the Parkinson’s disease organizations.  For organizations that take donations via the Internet, please click here.

Date of last update to PD Index: January 4, 2002.

http://www.pdindex.org/